The Weight of Weather — How does it affect your care plan?

You’ve probably heard that the East Coast has been smacked with severe snow storms. If you live in a warm place, you may be picturing stranded cars and ice dams. But if you’re also caring for someone with dementia, you probably realize that slippery roads are just a sliver of the weight that weather adds to care.

Between the Pond and the Woods

Frozen turkeys

For the past five weeks, I’ve had to run to the drugstore whenever the roads were clear to make sure we didn’t run out of essential stuff. We need a constant supply of wipes, medications, sanitary gloves, and Depends. People who’ve never done this work can snicker all they want. But carrying four economy sized bags of adult diapers to the car makes you a much stronger person (in MANY ways).

One of my biggest problems has been injury prevention. I hurt my shoulder back in June and have almost healed it several times. But every time it snows, I have to shovel a double wide wheelchair path so my mom can get to her medical transit bus. In a good week, I do this once and my shoulder has a few days to recover. But when the snows arrive back to back, I’m out there slinging all the time. In fact, this morning my lower back asked for a legal separation.

In the lulls between storms I must race to the supermarket, too. My tiny mom has a tremendous appetite. Applesauce — loved by babies and old folks alike — is something we stockpile. Same for sweet potatoes and fish. I can roast these things into soft nutritious meals my mother loves. Weather can’t get between me and her food supply.

Then of course there are the heating issues. I resolve this by lugging buckets to fill our coal burner every day. Last Thursday morning, it was 12 degrees below zero when I started making breakfast. Of the seven days in the week, the mercury dipped below zero at least five times. Mom just looks at me and laughs when I tell her the temperature. As long as the house stays warm, she’s content.

I ask myself to be strong every day. I do yoga to knead the aches and pains out of my joints. And I meditate to help me focus on what’s good in this situation. I’m lucky that I have the kind of job that allows me to care for my mom at home. And I’m grateful every day that my mother’s impairments haven’t soured her disposition. I know many others who must care for family members who are agitated or violent. We have been spared this. We are lucky.

So, as I finish this explanation of our challenges, I’m wondering how the weather gets in the way of your care plans. Does the drought in California keep you from washing bedclothes? How about the humidity down south? Does it affect your loved one’s temperament? It seems like it will be winter here for a long time to come, so please send a note to share what’s happening everywhere else.

Using Music in Dementia Care, Part 2: Theta Sounds

As we consider how music can improve caregiving, I’d like to introduce you to some music that may be new to you. Ever hear of Theta sounds? This is a kind of electronic music that many artists use to boost their creativity. I discovered — totally by accident — that Theta sounds have a nice effect on my mom, too.

Between the Pond and the Woods

I started listening to this music way back when I founded Liberties Scribblers, a creative writing group in Philadelphia. Several of our writers won prizes for their work including the late Paul Coff, an award winner with Philadelphia Poets magazine; Angel Hogan, winner of several First Person Story Slams; and Tremaine Johnson, another First Person winner. One of the poets I worked with swore that listening to electronic music helped him write better. On his recommendation, I bought a couple of  CD’s that included Theta sounds, which are supposed to help induce a creative mood.

This type of music is wordless and calming. But it also includes unusual sounds like the gong of a clock chime and buzzy notes that you can’t quite figure out. That’s because they are played at different frequencies and are directed toward  different parts of your brain. The science behind this kind of music is complex and I’ll tell you right now: I DON’T UNDERSTAND IT! In fact, I make no claims about what this music can or cannot do for you. What I will say is that I often listen to it before I start to work on a creative piece and if my mother is in the room, the music has a profound effect on her. The CD I use most often is part of the Creative Mind Series, by Dr. Jeffrey Thompson, but I am sure there are others with similar effects.

Here is a basic Wikipedia explanation of music that uses binaural beat stimulation including theta waves. Theta waves are related to states of deep meditation, relaxation, and REM sleep. From Wiki: “Binaural beat stimulation has been used fairly extensively in attempts to induce a variety of states of consciousness, and there has been some work done in regards to the effects of these stimuli on relaxation, focus, attention, and states of consciousness. Studies have shown that with repeated training to distinguish close frequency sounds that a plastic reorganization of the brain occurs for the trained frequencies and is capable of asymmetric hemispheric balancing.”

Did you grasp that? No, neither did I. But when I play this kind of music, my mother enters an incredible dream state that liberates her momentarily from the limitations of her body. She raises her arms and starts to move around as if she’s about to get out of her wheelchair. She laughs out loud and talks like she’s having a conversation with someone I can’t see. Her legs regain locomotion, the hands are expressive, and her garbled conversation is so full of joy. Very few things delight her in this way.

As I write this, two questions occur to me: 1) Would all people with advanced dementia respond in a positive way to this music? Probably not. They don’t all respond well to the same drugs so they may not share this kind of ecstatic reaction to music; and 2) Is there any down side to using this kind of music for stimulation? I haven’t noticed one yet and I’ve been playing this music for Mom for quite a while. It’s very relaxing, and she seems to feel good when she awakes from her music “trance”. I’m sure some medical center must be doing research on the use of theta wave music with dementia patients. If not, they will be soon. Let me know what happens if you try this technique in your house.