Tag Archives: research on dementia

What’s So Funny about Dementia?

Caregivers run into problems all the time. Some are more devastating than others. You can cry and wring your hands. But sometimes, if you remind yourself,  you can also laugh. Finding the humor in stressful situations can provide a powerful way to cope with real challenges.

Between the Pond and the Woods

Go ahead and laugh — it’s therapeutic

A young Dutch researcher named J.H.E. Blom, created a project to help get caregivers to laugh more as a way of easing their emotional burdens.  Studies show that humor can have a positive effect on health and can promote happier feelings in tough situations. Blom looked for ways to help caregivers laugh more in daily life.

The concept made me recall a story I heard from a nurse who was interviewing caregivers. She said she had talked with a caregiver who faced a constant battle from her loved one whenever it was time to change the Depends. Somewhere along the way, the caregiver invented “The Diaper Dance”. She put the clean Depends on her head like a hat, and started dancing around until the her loved one started laughing and dancing too. Once the element of humor took over, all resistance dropped and that diaper got changed.

It’s easy enough to come up with funny ideas like this when you’re relaxed.  The problem is, we often forget to think of these things when we’re stressed. Blom’s solution is a concept called Amarant. Caregivers were asked to create tokens that reminded them of humorous moments.  They could be a funny cartoon from the newspaper or just an object that reminded them of a funny moment — like a photo of someone wearing a Depends hat?  In the study, people used markers and stickers to create pictures or reminders of things that made them laugh.

After they created their “tokens” of humor, they displayed them all around the house. Blom’s goal was to have the caregiver “subtly confronted” with the pictures so that they might trigger positive emotions connected to funny memories in situations that were not too funny. Caregivers also made “inspirational cards” that asked questions designed to produce memories of laughter. Cards asked caregivers to recall the last situation when they wanted to hold in their laughter but just couldn’t — or to remember accidentally making a joke. Caregivers wrote these recollections on their cards so they could use them to help produce a laugh during more stressful times.

It would not be too hard to try this experiment in your own home. Considering all the depressing research we see about drugs, side effects, and caregiver health problems, it’s refreshing to come across a study that promotes humor. Laughter is the world’s cheapest medicine, no one hold a patent on it, and it’s absolutely impossible to overdose.

TBI — A New Term for the Dementia Handbook

Cause and effect are words that haunt us when caring for someone with dementia. Many times I ask myself how my health conscious mom ended up with such an awful disease. Is it genetic or did she suffer an early trauma that we don’t know about? Luckily I’m not the only person asking that question.

Between the Pond and the Woods

New research has been conducted to analyze huge volumes of medical records to see if there’s a connection between Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and later development of dementia. The research was carried out by Deborah E. Barnes, PhD, MPH, Allison Kaup, PhD, Katharine A. Kirby, MA, Amy L. Byers, PhD, MPH, Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, MD, PhD and Kristine Yaffe, MD of the University of California at San Francisco. The article describing their study appears in Neurology, the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Because they studied patient records and not brain chemistry, their work is easier to understand than many other scientific papers.

Basically, this research team reviewed medical records for 188,764 U.S. veterans who were 55 years of age or older. All patients in the study had at least one inpatient or outpatient visit during the period under review and none had a dementia diagnosis at their first visit.

By examining nearly a decade’s worth of patient records, the researchers tallied the number of veterans who had a diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) to see if TBI was associated with an increased incidence of dementia.

The research findings provide lots of food for thought. After controlling for the impact of other health factors, TBI in older veterans was associated with a 60% increase in the risk of developing dementia over 9 years.  According to the study’s authors, “TBI in older veterans may predispose toward development of symptomatic dementia”.  The study also raises a host of questions about how to treat TBI in younger veterans and other members of our society who have suffered brain injuries.

For lots of us, these finding won’t resolve the “cause/effect” question. But they give us plenty to think about while living in a society where so many young athletes suffer sports concussions, adults want to ride motorcycles without a helmet, and thousands of young people go off to fight in wars. I’m not suggesting that we cease all of these activities, just that we consider the cost that may be paid by those now suffering preventable pain.